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WOUND COMPASS Clinical Support App (CSA)

WOUND COMPASS Clinical Support App (CSA)

Increasingly, more non-wound specialists are treating chronic wounds.1 Limited wound care education and experience has resulted in a decline in confidence and inadequate adherence to formulary guidelines, leading to significant practice variation.2 There is an urgent need and opportunity to help reduce practice variation with a tool that aids wound assessment and decision-making3

Wounds decoded

The WOUND COMPASS Clinical Support App helps you to decode each unique wound, to help reduce practice variation.4

  • Customisable to customer's formulary
  • Shown to help improve formulary compliance*
  • Shown to help improve nurses’ confidence*
  • Designed to provide quick and easy point-of-care education

Validated by 70 clinicians through 400 assessments. Recommended by 100% of wound specialists surveyed (n=7).4,5

T.I.M.E.-based wound assessment

All wounds, like all patients, are unique. The WOUND COMPASS CSA helps you decode the wound step-by-step, providing a convenient tool to help improve confidence** in reading the signs.4 In just 90 seconds,***5 this easy-to-use app:

  • Helps categorise wounds by location, type, appearance, exudate and depth 
  • Provides guidance on product selection, customised to the user’s formulary
  • Shown to help improve formulary compliance*4 
  • Offers effective point of care educational resource
  • Provides guidance on when to consult a specialist

Specialist support when you need it most

There’s an urgent need and opportunity to reduce practice variation and improve patient outcomes.3 What if we could meet those challenges – regardless of specialty – using an application based on the proven principles of the T.I.M.E. clinical decision support tool (CDST) to help manage chronic wounds efficiently and consistently?3,6-11

Learn how to use the WOUND COMPASS CSA to help:

  • Confidence: 82% of non-wound specialists believe using the WOUND COMPASS CSA has improved their confidence when managing wounds**4
  • Ease-of-use: 83% of non-wound specialists felt the WOUND COMPASS CSA was easy-to-use****4
  • Point-of-care education: Utilising the WOUND COMPASS CSA can help improve wound care knowledge****4

The cost of inconsistency

The financial burden of wound management is considerably higher due to practice variation.

  • Budget limitations are exacerbated by inconsistent wound management practices and improper use of specialist formulary6
  • Compared to acute wounds, unhealed wounds can increase the consumption of resources, number of nurse visits and the cost of care12
  • Patient dissatisfaction, with the perceived lack of continuity and consistency of care, further stresses non-specialist clinicians, who must select from specialist formularies with limited training2,6

A new approach is needed.

Connect with a Smith+Nephew representative to customise the WOUND COMPASS CSA to your formulary today.

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*100% of Wound specialists surveyed believe the WOUND COMPASS CSA resulted in their teams being more compliant to the local formulary (n=7); 79% (54/68 clinicians) of non-wound specialists believed that use of the WOUND COMPASS CSA helped improve their compliance to the pathway and formulary when managing wounds.

**58/71 (82%) of non-wound specialists believe using the WOUND COMPASS CSA has improved their confidence when managing wounds.

***Based on the average time to complete assessment guidance through the WOUND COMPASS CSA.

****Rated as easy-to-use by 58/70 clinicians. Improvements in wound care knowledge reported by 71 non-wound specialists.

 

Citations:
1. Nursing in Practice. Good hygiene when dressing wounds. Available at: https://www.nursinginpractice.com/clinical/good-hygiene-when-dressing-wounds/. Accessed November 2021.
2. Gray TA, et al. What factors influence community wound care in the UK? A focus group study using the Theoretical Domains Framework. BMJ Open 2019; 9:e024859. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024859.
3. World Union of Wound Healing Societies (2020) Strategies to reduce practice variation in wound assessment and management: The T.I.M.E. Clinical Decision Support Tool. London: Wounds International. Available at: www.woundsinternational.com.
4. Smith+Nephew 2021. Clinical Support App Pilot Survey Results. Internal Report. CSD.AWM.21.002.
5. Smith+Nephew 2021. Wound Compass App Limited Market Release Pilot Phase Analytics. Internal Report. RD/21/074.
6. Moore Z et al. TIME CDST: an updated tool to address the current challenges in wound care 2019; 28(3):154–161.
7. Swanson T, Duynhoven K, Johnstone D. Using the new T.I.M.E. Clinical Decision Support Tool to promote consistent holistic wound management and to eliminate variation in practice in Victoria, Australia: Part 1. Wounds International. 2019;10(2):38–47.
8. Jelnes R, Halim AA, Mujakovic A, et al. Using the new T.I.M.E. Clinical Decision Support Tool to promote consistent holistic wound management and eliminate variation in practice: Part 2 at the Sygehus Sonderjylland Hospital, Sonderborg, Denmark.Wounds International. 2019;10(3):40–44.
9. Woo K. Using the new T.I.M.E. Clinical Decision Support Tool to promote consistent holistic wound management and eliminate variation in practice: Part 3 at the West Park Healthcare Centre, Chronic Care and Rehabilitation Hospital, Canada. Wounds International. 2019;10(2):38–47.
10. Walters S, Snowball G, Westmorland L, Spanjers J, Rozells A, Carville K. Using the new T.I.M.E. Clinical Decision Support Tool to promote consistent holistic wound management and eliminate variation in practice: Part 4 at Silver Chain Group, Perth, Australia. Wounds International. 2019;10(4):32-39.
11. Blackburn J, Ousey K, Stephenson J. Using the new T.I.M.E. Clinical Decision Support Tool to promote consistent holistic wound management and eliminate variation in practice: Part 5, survey feedback from non-specialists. Wounds International. 2019;10(4):40-49.
12. Guest JF et al. Health economic burden that different wound types impose on the UK’s National Health Service. Int Wound J 2016; 14(2):322–330.